Politics Q&As with 23 candidates running for Oregon governor

Discussion in 'Blazers OT Forum' started by SlyPokerDog, May 13, 2022.

  1. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    Tina Kotek
    Portland
    Oregon House Speaker

    The Oregon governor’s office is usually reactive when it comes to dealing with drought. What specific steps would you take to provide long-term solutions for years of increasing drought?

    The state should be a proactive, collaborative partner with local governments to make sure we maximize water resources in the most efficient and effective ways. As House Speaker, I supported increased investments in the necessary studies and new approaches for water conservation and usage. Climate change is causing longer and more frequent drought periods. As governor, I will advocate for new investments in water infrastructure and convene the regional conversations that are instrumental to helping communities be more resilient.

    In the absence of action by the legislature, Gov. Brown created a climate protection plan by executive order to reduce carbon emissions. That plan is being challenged in court. If elected, would you renew that order or rescind it? Why?

    I support the climate protection plan currently in place via executive order and will continue this work as governor.

    Climate change is not theoretical to Oregonians – it is real for us, right now. From heat waves to wildfires to droughts and flooding, our communities are experiencing the impacts of climate change. We need to be bold in our approaches. I am proud to be the strongest proponent of climate action and clean energy in the race for governor. That’s why I’ve earned the endorsement of the Oregon League of Conservation Voters.

    As House Speaker, I made sure that we took strategic steps to combat climate change by transitioning our state to 100% clean electricity by 2040, passing a first-in-the-nation law to end the use of dirty coal-fired power by 2035, and reducing air pollution from cars and trucks with the Clean Fuels Program.

    Unfortunately, partisan obstructionism in the legislature prevented lawmakers from pursuing the full range of actions needed to combat this crisis at the scale necessary to ensure resiliency for our communities, leaving Gov. Brown no choice but to step in and issue an executive order.

    When Oregonians elect a new governor in November, it will be a choice between continuing to move forward on fighting climate change, or risk going backwards. That means the resiliency, the vitality, of our communities is at stake. We need to continue building on the progress that we have made, and that means we need to elect a governor who will fight for environmental protections and not one who will cower to special interests and put the well-being of our communities at risk.

    In addition to climate change, scientists throughout the state have raised concerns that Oregon’s reliance on “clearing fuel” as a form of forest management contributes to worsening conditions. Conversely, timber industry groups continue to champion industrially planted forests and timber harvests as an important tool in suppressing wildfires. What stakeholders would you include in conversation as you develop your forest management policy?

    As House Speaker, I supported communities impacted by destructive wildfires, working alongside leaders from rural Oregon to pass comprehensive legislation to build community resilience in responding to and preventing wildfires, including:
    Requiring the Department of Forestry to develop a comprehensive statewide map of wildfire risk to better identify and alert vulnerable populations and communities of potential threats.

    Requiring the state to adopt new wildfire hazard mitigation standards when constructing new buildings so communities are more resilient to potential disasters in the future.

    Creating a wildfire emergency shelter program because every Oregonian impacted by wildfires deserves access to support in the face of disaster.

    Funding programs to provide filtration systems to address wildfire smoke to help mitigate the public health impacts of wildfires on our communities.

    Investing in workforce training programs to help train young Oregonians to manage our forest lands so that we can grow the pipeline to train and prepare a workforce to prevent and respond to wildfires in the future.

    When it comes to forest management policy, I will include all perspectives in the conversation and strongly rely on what the scientific research says is the best approach to improving the resiliency of our forests.

    Measure 110 decriminalized drugs in Oregon while stepping up treatment. How would you confront the state’s failure to meet the intent of the law to ensure thousands of Oregonians get treatment?

    Oregonians overwhelmingly voted to pass Measure 110 because they believe that a health-based approach to addiction and overdose is more effective, humane and cost-effective than criminal punishments. When someone is ready to go into treatment, we need to ensure there is a treatment bed or program ready and waiting for them so they can get the help they need when they are ready to receive it.

    As House Speaker, I worked to facilitate the implementation of the promises of Measure 110 last year, including allocating $20 million in up-front funding to prepare providers for the full funding that was scheduled to be distributed early this year. The failure of the Oregon Health Authority to get resources out the door to Oregonians struggling with addiction is unacceptable.

    One of the reasons I am running for governor is to make sure our state government can deliver on what people need. The delayed rollout of Measure 110 is truly a life or death issue, and when we have a health care crisis as big as this, the state needs to be able to follow through.

    As governor, I will work hard to make sure Oregonians have access to the treatment they need, when they need it. We can’t wait.

    What state action would you direct to confront the threat to health and safety posed by fentanyl?

    As House Speaker, I supported all recent efforts to make it as easy as possible to obtain naloxone to save the lives of individuals experiencing an opioid overdose. As governor, I will continue these efforts, as well as improve access to addiction treatment services throughout the state and work with the federal government to crack down on the illegal manufacture, distribution and sale of fentanyl.

    What steps would you take to address the stress of educators, students and parents and keep our public K-12 schools from imploding?

    Every Oregon child should have a safe, supportive place to receive a high-quality public education. The COVID-19 pandemic has been traumatic for students, parents and educators. As governor, my goal will be to support our schools to respond to this trauma and keep our young people learning and on a successful path to graduation.

    In 2019, as House Speaker, I made sure the legislature took a giant leap forward in solving the longstanding problem of our underfunded schools by passing historic legislation to bring an additional $1 billion per year to our schools. The Student Success Act is now bringing new targeted investments to improve access to early childhood education, fully fund career and technical education (as envisioned by voters when they passed Measure 98), increase social and emotional supports for students so they can thrive (for example, more counselors and social workers), and expand community-based equity initiatives to make sure every student is successful.

    As governor, I will be laser-focused on making sure the Student Success Act dollars are being utilized successfully. Additionally, I will continue to support summer and afterschool programs that provide additional opportunities for students to get back on track academically after the pandemic school years. I will work with parents, students, and educators to ensure we can create a system where every Oregon child succeeds.

    Do you believe that the K-12 system in Oregon should get involved in early childhood care to help provide more child care options and education, and if so, how?

    Every family deserves access to high-quality, affordable child care and early learning options in their community. As the former policy director of Children First for Oregon, I am familiar with the science that shows the importance of the first few years of life for healthy brain development and life-long learning.

    As governor, I will ensure that recent state investments in child care and early learning options deliver the results we need, especially addressing the severe lack of child care in some parts of Oregon. To do this, it will be important to develop a stronger pipeline of early childhood professionals and support the current workforce with increased professional development opportunities.

    Some school districts have already begun to integrate pre-K learning opportunities into their schools through enhanced community partnerships, Head Start/Oregon PreK programs, or the inclusion of Preschool Promise classrooms – or all of the above. School districts should be strong partners as we work to make sure every child has what they need no matter where they live in the state.

    What do you see as the two biggest barriers to creating an adequate supply of child care in Oregon, and what do you propose to change to help alleviate the shortage of child care?

    The two biggest barriers are inadequate public investments and a poorly compensated workforce (and these issues are intertwined). Child care needs to be valued more and seen as basic infrastructure that is vital for the success of our families and our communities. It should be adequately funded and supported. We cannot depend on the private sector, particularly the network of small businesses who provide a lot of the care, to expand without more public investment.

    As governor, I will focus on making sure recent improvements in child care/early learning funding deliver the results we need and expand access to child care above pre-pandemic levels. This will include investments in community-based child care to help these programs be more accessible, as well as a comprehensive approach to cutting down on red tape that makes it difficult to provide child care in Oregon. Additionally, I will focus on supporting our child care workforce by increasing state payments so early childhood educators can be paid better and improving professional development opportunities so this work can be a long-term career.

    It is likely that Oregonians will need to consider a dedicated funding source to provide the needed public investment to substantially improve child care access and quality so every family has what they need for their children.

    Much of the economy of rural Oregon is based on agriculture, natural resource extraction and tourism. Agriculture is consolidating, natural resource extraction is in decline, and tourism provides mostly minimum-wage jobs. As governor, what are the first three steps you would take to build a stronger economy in rural Oregon?

    As governor, my first three steps for supporting the economic vitality of our rural communities will be: (1) listen and learn by engaging with local leaders through intentional conversations about their vision for their communities; (2) make sure state plans to use new investments to expand access to high-speed internet to every part of our state are on track; and (3) consult with and support the work of key public agencies (for example, OSU Extension) to meet the needs of our natural resource economies.

    State government has a lot of tools to help the economy. Please rank the following to show your support, with 1 being the highest priory. Use 0 for any idea you do not support.
    __ Targeted tax breaks for key industries
    __ Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.
    __ Direct financial aid to specific businesses
    __ Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?
    __ Other (be specific)


    4) Targeted tax breaks for key industries

    1) Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.

    3) Direct financial aid to specific businesses

    2) Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?

    What specific steps would you take to increase access to housing and housing stock for low and middle-income Oregonians?

    Oregon’s housing and homelessness crisis is the most pressing issue impacting our communities. As governor, I will bring more urgency to help our unhoused neighbors get into permanent housing, and I will also focus on increasing the overall amount of housing in our state.

    Oregon has a shortage of at least 111,000 homes, with the greatest shortage being homes that are affordable to lower-income families. Statewide, we need to build about 36,000 new homes each year over the next decade to address the current shortage of housing and keep pace with future housing demand.

    As House Speaker, I led the way to invest more than $1.5 billion over the last five years to help build more affordable housing, provide more rental assistance to keep people housed, and maintain the current supply of affordable housing. But that’s not enough. As your governor, I will lead a comprehensive approach to tackling our housing and homelessness crisis, focusing on these five priorities:

    End unsheltered homelessness for veterans, families with children, unaccompanied young adults, and people 65 years and older by 2025, and continue to strengthen pathways to permanent housing for all Oregonians experiencing homelessness.

    Build enough housing to meet the need for people currently experiencing homelessness, address the current shortage of housing, and keep pace with future affordable housing demand by 2033.

    Advance racial equity by reducing the racial homeownership gap by 20 percent by 2027.

    Keep people housed who are currently on the brink of homelessness.

    Encourage intergovernmental and private sector partnerships to have more effective and efficient responses to solving this crisis.

    If we’re going to solve Oregon’s housing crisis, we need both near-term and long-term strategies. As governor, I will move Oregon forward on meeting both the immediate challenges and tackling the root causes of this crisis.

    How would you support local efforts to provide designated places for unhoused Oregonians including overnight parking sites, tent camping sites and tiny homes? Would that support include seeking state funding?

    Oregon’s housing and homelessness crisis is the most pressing issue we face. I will bring more urgency to help our unhoused neighbors get stable and into permanent housing.

    As House Speaker, I got more state money to local communities to meet immediate shelter needs. For example, I was able to get $5 million to create a shelter in a former Rite-Aid store, and right now it’s a 24/7 shelter serving 50 people inside every day, providing the necessary stability to help people transition into permanent housing. I also made sure there were a dozen stand-alone pod shelters at the site in the parking lot for people who would do better with more privacy.

    I also successfully fought to provide more shelter during the pandemic and for Oregonians made houseless by the 2020 Labor Day wildfires by securing $75 million for Project Turnkey, an effort to repurpose motel properties to create more transitional housing. In less than seven months, Project Turnkey created 19 new shelters in 13 counties, resulting in a 20% increase in the state supply of shelter beds for people in need.

    Recently, I traveled to Southern Oregon where I visited with the great folks at Rogue Retreat. Rogue Retreat offers an entire continuum of services to unhoused Oregonians in the Medford area - from a traditional shelter to managed tent sites to tiny home villages. We can solve this crisis with determination, coordination, and targeted resources.

    As governor, I am going to work with our community partners and local governments to set up as many opportunities for safe shelter as possible for our unhoused neighbors – from managed RV parks to tiny home villages. We need to do it all to get every Oregonian into safe and stable housing so that they can have the permanency they need.

    The legislature has been working to make it easier to build more units of housing in cities, to close the gap between housing supply and demand. Has it gone far enough? Will you make it easier for cities to adopt practices allowing more rapid and more dense construction?

    Oregon is healthier and safer when everyone has somewhere to live in security, peace and dignity. Right now, Oregon has a shortage of at least 111,000 homes, with the greatest shortage being homes that are affordable to lower-income families. Statewide, we need to build about 36,000 new homes each year over the next decade to address the current shortage of housing and keep pace with future housing demand.

    Oregonians value and believe in our land use system, and so do I. That’s why I have focused on doing new things to create more housing choices within existing urban growth boundaries in order to protect our farms and forests. I have worked to streamline permitting so faith communities can convert their properties into affordable housing more quickly. I passed nationally-recognized legislation to support more housing options in our established neighborhoods. I also put us on a path to truly understand the housing supply problem in all parts of the state through assessing local and regional needs. Our land use system can and must support the housing Oregonians need.

    As governor, I will get to work on Day One to put in place a bold agenda to shelter Oregonians currently experiencing homelessness, address the current shortage of housing, and keep pace with future affordable housing demand. With regard to new development, this will mean meeting local housing production targets in an equitable way to create more inclusive communities and address historic patterns of segregation by income, create the construction workforce necessary to do this work, and encourage innovation, streamline permit processes, and support housing developers to scale up to build these homes.
     
  2. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    Keisha Lanell Merchant
    Corvallis
    Artist

    The Oregon governor’s office is usually reactive when it comes to dealing with drought. What specific steps would you take to provide long-term solutions for years of increasing drought?

    Build more food forests, increase collection on rainwater and ocean water purification Innovative systems, develop new cactus farming to ensure survival species. Change the way we collect water. Develop smart technologies systems into communities and cities to increase opportunities of excellent performance in distribution. This may be futuristic, but it is necessary to start thinking creatively using inventions and innovation as the hanging gardens in the ancient times with many types of of water systems to provide Quality access to water.

    In the absence of action by the legislature, Gov. Brown created a climate protection plan by executive order to reduce carbon emissions. That plan is being challenged in court. If elected, would you renew that order or rescind it? Why?

    I have my own plan. Most of my plans won't go through the legislature. My action plan is to build communities and businesses, professionals to become a complete experience for high-performance contributor(s). My plan is to release all the grant money and to assemble all the staff to begin the process to become an interactive support system to the community building and good Stewardship platform campaign. This will create campus living for over 200 cities in Oregon leaving less than 10 cities traditional and governmental regulated.

    In addition to climate change, scientists throughout the state have raised concerns that Oregon’s reliance on “clearing fuel” as a form of forest management contributes to worsening conditions. Conversely, timber industry groups continue to champion industrially planted forests and timber harvests as an important tool in suppressing wildfires. What stakeholders would you include in conversation as you develop your forest management policy?

    I'll begin with the communities that live in Oregon. I will include everyone at the table. This decision is for everyone. All recommendations will be welcomed. Of course, my Good Stewardship platform campaign includes food forests, water systems, smart technologies systems, and includes a virtual help desk. For start, Forest management will begin with restructuring its selection of species to plant to decrease fire and water concerns. Increase fire-resistant and waterproof materials in the foundation of the forests. For example stop using bark, high flammable species like Douglas fir, and shrubs for floor covering species in the forests. Basic stuff. It is time to be known for cedarwood, bamboo, myrrh, and frankincense trees. For example, using Frankincense essential oil can help clean the air from pathogens allowing you to breathe cleaner air. This is beneficial during the flu season because of its antiseptic and disinfectant properties that eliminate cold and flu germs present on the air

    Measure 110 decriminalized drugs in Oregon while stepping up treatment. How would you confront the state’s failure to meet the intent of the law to ensure thousands of Oregonians get treatment?

    Create universal basic care clinics from the alternative health, wellness, fitness to allow natural remedies and self-control to be part of the process.

    What state action would you direct to confront the threat to health and safety posed by fentanyl?

    My Good Stewardship platform campaign includes Maslow's principles in motivation and needs assessment. It will be used to resolve and confront all social responsibility to our Oregonians Quality of Life and Lifestyle choices plus interaction with the environment as a government, individual, and as professional.

    What steps would you take to address the stress of educators, students and parents and keep our public K-12 schools from imploding?

    Increase Game and play theory in the school system and campus infrastructure for seminars, workshops, and conferences, concerts, and clinics, even camps for K-12 ...to include curriculum that can be done virtually and in virtual reality and use smart technologies.

    Do you believe that the K-12 system in Oregon should get involved in early childhood care to help provide more child care options and education, and if so, how?

    Yes. I believe we can structure preK-12 as campuses and Universities for our children solely using gaming systems, simulations, science, technologies, and more. We can also add 24/7/365 for all campuses and Universities we develop for childcare and education systems instead of the school-to-prison infrastructure.

    What do you see as the two biggest barriers to creating an adequate supply of child care in Oregon, and what do you propose to change to help alleviate the shortage of child care?

    To be resourceful by using parks until the 24/7/365 campuses custom design for children from birth to 12 are built. Use what we have until we build all the new structures. To use global brands that provide open source forums, free of charge services as promotions and sponsorships, work with professionals who want to serve in the Good Stewardship platform campaign.

    Much of the economy of rural Oregon is based on agriculture, natural resource extraction and tourism. Agriculture is consolidating, natural resource extraction is in decline, and tourism provides mostly minimum-wage jobs. As governor, what are the first three steps you would take to build a stronger economy in rural Oregon?

    Align all 200 to 250 rural cities under Parks and Recreations, Forestry Management as structured with Park and Urban Rangers to structure all public lands into national parks and recreation for tourism and environmental justice system for all Oregonians.

    State government has a lot of tools to help the economy. Please rank the following to show your support, with 1 being the highest priory. Use 0 for any idea you do not support.
    __ Targeted tax breaks for key industries
    __ Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.
    __ Direct financial aid to specific businesses
    __ Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?
    __ Other (be specific)


    Tax exemption state. #1

    Universal Financial Aid system #2 for education and training and businesses
    #3 infrastructure

    #4 assess and study all the laws of Oregon to examine the effectiveness of all the policies, processes, and best practices of Oregon and align it with the Maslow's principles of needs and motivation.

    What specific steps would you take to increase access to housing and housing stock for low and middle-income Oregonians?

    Universal housing on public lands. Tax exemption, and Universal housing in all abandoned sites, and properties, and buildings or businesses, renovate and get habitat with humanity to partner with organizations to renovate inactive sites. Provide Urban and Park ranger systems, and let communities to live rent-free in return for social responsibility to the space.

    How would you support local efforts to provide designated places for unhoused Oregonians including overnight parking sites, tent camping sites and tiny homes? Would that support include seeking state funding?

    I would provide grants, utilize our grant writers and provide Urban and Park Rangers to serve as a peace corps to help all communities to build environmental justice system (s) for all population (s)

    The legislature has been working to make it easier to build more units of housing in cities, to close the gap between housing supply and demand. Has it gone far enough? Will you make it easier for cities to adopt practices allowing more rapid and more dense construction?

    I am moving in the direction to take all inactive public lands to provide ecosystems, conservation platforms by providing tax exemption, housing, renovation to meet the needs and motivation for all displaced communities and unemployed communities locked out of the credit markets, housing markets, and service and product markets based on employer's preference or inconveniences (CONVENIENCES PRIVILEGES AND RIGHTS). AT WILL STATE.
     
  3. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    Tobias Read
    Beaverton
    Oregon State Treasurer

    The Oregon governor’s office is usually reactive when it comes to dealing with drought. What specific steps would you take to provide long-term solutions for years of increasing drought?

    Addressing the drought situation will take collaboration with ranchers, farmers, tribal leaders, and local governments to coordinate conservation and drought management efforts with a specific focus on the ground programs lead by local communities. Additionally, we need to make long-term investments in water infrastructure to help mitigate against the climate-related impacts–increased water storage, improved monitoring, and covering canals where feasible.

    In the absence of action by the legislature, Gov. Brown created a climate protection plan by executive order to reduce carbon emissions. That plan is being challenged in court. If elected, would you renew that order or rescind it? Why?

    We need to take substantial steps to address climate change and I am supportive of actions that reduce carbon emissions. As governor, I’ll continue to work towards our goal of 100% clean energy by 2040. Most importantly, I’ll focus on creating broad coalitions that cross the urban and rural divide to build more substantial support for how Oregon needs to address the climate crisis. For example, I will include carbon sequestration projects on agricultural and forest lands, either through the use of alternative crops and ranching practices or by encouraging forest owners to grow older trees that store more carbon.

    In addition to climate change, scientists throughout the state have raised concerns that Oregon’s reliance on “clearing fuel” as a form of forest management contributes to worsening conditions. Conversely, timber industry groups continue to champion industrially planted forests and timber harvests as an important tool in suppressing wildfires. What stakeholders would you include in conversation as you develop your forest management policy?

    Over the last 5 years, I have worked closely with a diverse group of Oregonians to create what will be known as the Elliott State Research Forest. The process brought together conservation groups along with timber organizations, tribes, and other community groups to solve a problem that has been facing the state for decades. This experience will directly influence how I approach conversations around forest management as governor. By building well-rounded and diverse coalitions we can build solutions that will last. Finally, the research performed on the Elliott will help provide a better understanding of how to manage forests in a rapidly changing climate.

    Measure 110 decriminalized drugs in Oregon while stepping up treatment. How would you confront the state’s failure to meet the intent of the law to ensure thousands of Oregonians get treatment?

    Oregon is long on good intentions and short on follow through. The implementation of Measure 110 has been very concerning to me. In Oregon, nearly 1 in 5 people struggle with substance abuse, yet we rank 50th in access to treatment. We need to move efficiently towards getting money out to the community to address this problem and as governor I’ll ensure OHA works aggressively to move money quickly, and I’ll hold people accountable if they don’t. We can’t let process-related excuses, like the need for more stakeholder input, to get in the way of results. Strong leadership can lead to strong processes and swift action.

    What state action would you direct to confront the threat to health and safety posed by fentanyl?

    This is another example of where the delay in distributing Measure 110 money is having a direct impact on the lives of Oregonians. Community addiction treatment programs need money immediately to ensure they have the resources to address the growing threat of Fentanyl. Additionally, we need to ensure law enforcement has the resources it needs to address the Fentanyl crisis and keep Oregonians safe. In particular, we need to make sure our Oregon State Police have additional resources and work with federal law enforcement agencies to stop fentanyl from making it into Oregon communities.

    What steps would you take to address the stress of educators, students and parents and keep our public K-12 schools from imploding?

    The pandemic has left a lasting mark on our education system. Teachers have left the profession at alarming rates and we’ve seen increasing numbers of students struggling with their mental health. First, we need to make sure teachers have the support they need to be successful. That includes having the classroom support they need to provide quality instruction to students, and that teacher compensation is sufficient to recruit and retain high-quality teachers. Second, we need to increase access to mental health services at school by investing in the mental health workforce and providing resources to schools to build out their mental health services. Finally, we need to look at removing the cost that teachers face when applying for licenses and credentials from the State.

    Do you believe that the K-12 system in Oregon should get involved in early childhood care to help provide more child care options and education, and if so, how?

    There are absolutely opportunities for community schools to play a role in addressing the childcare crisis. As governor, I want to implement universal Pre-K across Oregon to give Oregon kids the start they deserve and to help address a portion of the childcare problem in Oregon. I want schools to be the center of communities and I’m encouraged by partnerships I’ve seen in communities where schools can offer land or building resources to build more childcare facilities. I look forward to supporting similar efforts as governor.

    What do you see as the two biggest barriers to creating an adequate supply of child care in Oregon, and what do you propose to change to help alleviate the shortage of child care?

    First, we need to invest in the childcare workforce. Childcare providers are vastly underpaid which results in high turnover rates and burnout. We need to increase wages for childcare workers and make long-term investments to increase the childcare workforce in Oregon. Second, we need to address the cost of childcare. As governor, I want to look at creating a state-level family child tax credit for low and moderate-income Oregonians to help alleviate the cost of childcare.

    Much of the economy of rural Oregon is based on agriculture, natural resource extraction and tourism. Agriculture is consolidating, natural resource extraction is in decline, and tourism provides mostly minimum-wage jobs. As governor, what are the first three steps you would take to build a stronger economy in rural Oregon?

    I believe that all of these industries can continue to provide important economic development opportunities in rural Oregon, but not without leadership and a coherent strategy from the state. Certainly, these industries are changing, but Oregon can be at the forefront of this change with the right strategies. Mass timber construction, Oregon’s seafood and agricultural exports, and our reputation as a destination for locally produced food and beverages provide some opportunities for growth. But not without a strategy and a commitment from state government. First, we need to make investments in education, apprenticeship, and job training programs to ensure that kids have the skills they need to pursue family-wage jobs and start the next small business in these communities. Second, we need to support our agricultural extension services at OSU that help keep Oregon ag on the cutting edge of new developments. Third, we must work with partners at the Port of Portland and industry leaders to find new markets for our products.

    State government has a lot of tools to help the economy. Please rank the following to show your support, with 1 being the highest priory. Use 0 for any idea you do not support.
    __ Targeted tax breaks for key industries
    __ Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.
    __ Direct financial aid to specific businesses
    __ Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?
    __ Other (be specific)


    4) Targeted tax breaks for key industries

    1) Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.

    3) Direct financial aid to specific businesses

    2) Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation

    What specific steps would you take to increase access to housing and housing stock for low and middle-income Oregonians?

    There is no solution to our housing crisis that won’t involve the private sector working closely with state and local government. We need more investment in housing, and that will only occur when we identify the specific measures that will unlock these dollars–increasing access to buildable land, co-investing in building critical infrastructure, and providing flexibility in our land use planning system in exchange for developments that meet our climate goals. And we must look to streamline and remove red tape in order to deploy the billions of dollars that have already been approved by the State and Metro-area governments to build more affordable housing in Oregon.

    How would you support local efforts to provide designated places for unhoused Oregonians including overnight parking sites, tent camping sites and tiny homes? Would that support include seeking state funding?

    There has been some encouraging success around the use of tiny homes to address the crisis in housing needs and I am interested in supporting similar community efforts, especially when they are paired with wrap-around services to address mental health and substance abuse issues.

    The legislature has been working to make it easier to build more units of housing in cities, to close the gap between housing supply and demand. Has it gone far enough? Will you make it easier for cities to adopt practices allowing more rapid and more dense construction?

    It is encouraging to see communities look for creative ways to close the gap between housing supply and demand and pursuing more dense construction in populated areas will help us close that gap. As governor, I’ll work closely with local government leaders to assess their current housing needs and look for opportunities for the state to be a partner in helping them meet those needs, either through additional funding or through legislative help to address statutory issues.
     
  4. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    Patrick Starnes
    Brownsville
    Home Restorer/Cabinetmaker

    The Oregon governor’s office is usually reactive when it comes to dealing with drought. What specific steps would you take to provide long-term solutions for years of increasing drought?

    I am the only governor candidate who was elected several times and has served for over 10 years on Soil & Water Conservation Districts and on watershed councils with tribes, farmers and ranchers.
    Lots of water is lost in our canal systems in eastern Oregon. As governor I would lead the effort to line the canals so we do not lose water through absorption and also build shade over canals with miles of solar panels.

    The governor is responsible for the Water Resources Department and we need to meter water use so folks are not using more than their right allows. Also, we can do more with high-efficiency irrigation systems and there are Federal dollars to help with that.

    In the absence of action by the legislature, Gov. Brown created a climate protection plan by executive order to reduce carbon emissions. That plan is being challenged in court. If elected, would you renew that order or rescind it? Why?

    I would continue the governor's work and use the bully pulpit for legislation for carbon reform.

    My focus on reducing Oregon’s greenhouse gasses would be in our transportation system which is almost 40% of our footprint. I would lead the effort to amend the Oregon Constitution that restricts our carbon revenue to only building more roads. Communities need the freedom to use carbon revenue in their own local-driven initiatives. In the three-county Metro area transportation is 42% of their footprint and they could do more to make their public transit system faster, free and frequent. Cleaner and better transit doesn’t only help reduce high congestion on highways and greenhouse emissions; efficient public transit helps low-income families get to work, to their health clinics and out of their food deserts.

    In addition to climate change, scientists throughout the state have raised concerns that Oregon’s reliance on “clearing fuel” as a form of forest management contributes to worsening conditions. Conversely, timber industry groups continue to champion industrially planted forests and timber harvests as an important tool in suppressing wildfires. What stakeholders would you include in conversation as you develop your forest management policy?

    I support the recent wildfire legislation passed during the 2021 session in the form of SB762 which created the Oregon Conservation Corps (OCC) which puts “boots on the ground” in our local communities. Yet, the revenue for OCC needs to be more secure so I would lead the fight for an increase on the timber severance tax and also a new excise tax on raw logs being shipped out of Oregon to overseas sawmills. With every log shipped out of Oregon, we lose important high-paying jobs right here at home! My father was a mill worker and I was a cabinetmaker for over 30 years so I know we can do more with our wood products.

    Measure 110 decriminalized drugs in Oregon while stepping up treatment. How would you confront the state’s failure to meet the intent of the law to ensure thousands of Oregonians get treatment?

    I think the new program is in the infant stages so we need to be fair so that we don’t have our expectations high and unreasonable. Already, we have served 16,000 Oregonians with addiction services and we would not have done so without this new reform. Granted, we can do more and that is why I support ohp4all as it will provide mental health services and addiction treatment services for the almost 300,000 working Oregonians who have NO health insurance currently!

    What state action would you direct to confront the threat to health and safety posed by fentanyl?

    Drug abuse, over-eating, alcoholism are all health issues. By providing OHP4all we can keep people from taking these paths of abuse and at the same time, we can provide addiction services in every community across the state.

    I am the only one of the top three Democratic candidates who is in favor of a single-payer health system in Oregon and I have a proposal to pay for it. Imagine the leverage we will have if all 4,200,000 Oregonians are on the same policy! Also, ohp4all is transferable: so, no matter where you work it will transfer with you, including when you go back to school to improve your skills. Every Oregonian will be covered.

    What steps would you take to address the stress of educators, students and parents and keep our public K-12 schools from imploding?

    I am the only candidate for governor who was elected several times and served over 10 years on school boards in Oregon. Since the largest part of our State budget is education (40%): I believe school board experience should be required for anyone who is elected to serve in Salem. My years of elected experience on school boards allowed me to recognize why OHP4all is important for our schools, cities and counties. A large percentage of our classroom dollars are going to private-for-profit health insure Corporations. With OHP4all, now all the money will be staying in the classroom and we can use the resources to help teachers with either better pay or by hiring more teaching assistants.

    Do you believe that the K-12 system in Oregon should get involved in early childhood care to help provide more child care options and education, and if so, how?

    Yes, I think our K-12 infrastructure can be used not only for pre-K day care but also for after-school day care and as a way to engage youth in extracurricular activities for families who have transportation challenges.

    What do you see as the two biggest barriers to creating an adequate supply of child care in Oregon, and what do you propose to change to help alleviate the shortage of child care?

    Working poor families struggle with that added cost when they go to work and there is much we can do with our existing public school infrastructure to supplement Oregon families’ needs. Transportation is also a difficulty for many households so a better public transit system will also lift burdens from those who are finding it difficult to make ends meet.

    Much of the economy of rural Oregon is based on agriculture, natural resource extraction and tourism. Agriculture is consolidating, natural resource extraction is in decline, and tourism provides mostly minimum-wage jobs. As governor, what are the first three steps you would take to build a stronger economy in rural Oregon?

    Many of our areas where Oregon is experiencing growth in tourism (via AirB&Bs, etc.), we are seeing less and less affordable housing for those who serve our tourists: those who change the beds at the AirB&Bs, pump our gas or serve our meals. As Oregon’s next governor I will lead the effort to build more affordable housing along the coast or up near our ski resorts for our working families.

    State government has a lot of tools to help the economy. Please rank the following to show your support, with 1 being the highest priory. Use 0 for any idea you do not support.
    __ Targeted tax breaks for key industries
    __ Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.
    __ Direct financial aid to specific businesses
    __ Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?
    __ Other (be specific)


    2) Targeted tax breaks for working families
    3) Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.

    5) Direct financial aid to specific businesses
    4) Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?

    1) Other (be specific) Provide ohp4all and then provide FREE training for those who are laid off from the private-for-profit health insurance industry to become NEW healthcare providers: CNAs, dental assistants, nurses, doctors and many other opportunities.

    What specific steps would you take to increase access to housing and housing stock for low and middle-income Oregonians?

    I am the only candidate for governor who has increased housing in Oregon. My wife and I restore old abandoned houses (often abandoned for over 6 years). Doing this work helped me develop my plan for the Oregon Shelter Fund (OSF) which will be outside the General Fund in Salem. When I come up with a new fund I feel responsible to propose a way to pay for it. A Vacancy Fee on these old abandoned properties will not only put revenue into the OSF but also push incentives on the owners of these abandoned properties to restore them and provide us more housing. Often these abandoned properties are owned by wealthy out of state interests who are using them to write off the depreciation. The OSF can be used for matching funds with Federal and local dollars to provide permanent housing for the unhoused and also for working families so they can eventually own them.

    How would you support local efforts to provide designated places for unhoused Oregonians including overnight parking sites, tent camping sites and tiny homes? Would that support include seeking state funding?

    Yes, as governor our would support local efforts to find solutions both temporary and permanent housing for the unhoused. With the Oregon Shelter Fund, the State of Oregon can finally become a serious partner with these non-profits, local governments which help leverage more Federal support as well.

    The legislature has been working to make it easier to build more units of housing in cities, to close the gap between housing supply and demand. Has it gone far enough? Will you make it easier for cities to adopt practices allowing more rapid and more dense construction?

    Yes, in some small of our abandoned timber towns across Oregon, the old commercial buildings on Main Street may need to become dense residential housing which can give these downtowns a new boost. We can look at new mixed-use opportunities in all kinds of neighborhoods of our cities while at the same time protecting our invaluable farm forest lands outside our urban areas.
     
  5. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    John Sweeney
    Portland
    Proprietor, Canary Castle Gallery

    The Oregon governor’s office is usually reactive when it comes to dealing with drought. What specific steps would you take to provide long-term solutions for years of increasing drought?

    I think that we must look to piping systems all over the state. Yes, it will cost a lot of money. But, in the long run, it will pay off.

    Added fact; every day over 85 degrees, it takes off 3 inches off of the water table. Ten days, 30 inches (2 1/2 feet), that is a lot.

    In the absence of action by the legislature, Gov. Brown created a climate protection plan by executive order to reduce carbon emissions. That plan is being challenged in court. If elected, would you renew that order or rescind it? Why?

    I do not know the details of that executive order.

    In addition to climate change, scientists throughout the state have raised concerns that Oregon’s reliance on “clearing fuel” as a form of forest management contributes to worsening conditions. Conversely, timber industry groups continue to champion industrially planted forests and timber harvests as an important tool in suppressing wildfires. What stakeholders would you include in conversation as you develop your forest management policy?

    Many wildfires start in the tall grass & brush alongside the roads & highways. And, in many cases, it is from the high heat of the catalytic converters, which reach 1,000 degrees, which is above the kindling point of grass & brush. We need to educate people to not park in tall grass or brush. The state, most governments & people own vehicles newer than 2010. And, can use E-85 gas or biodiesel fuels. Which are much cleaner burning.

    We can educate people to type into their computers "buying E-85 gas/biodiesel fuels."

    Measure 110 decriminalized drugs in Oregon while stepping up treatment. How would you confront the state’s failure to meet the intent of the law to ensure thousands of Oregonians get treatment?

    M 110, is another case of the state dropping the ball. I will SPUR the legislature into action to solve this problem.

    What state action would you direct to confront the threat to health and safety posed by fentanyl?

    Selling fentanyl must be viewed as "attempted murder." And processed as such. We must end this problem.

    What steps would you take to address the stress of educators, students and parents and keep our public K-12 schools from imploding?

    We need to keep our schools open.

    For the 7th grade, I want to have 4-9 week courses. Why, the 7th grade, that is when they become teenagers. And, let them know that it is for 7 years & that they will make it through.

    1. Money Management; saving & investing

    2, Make a life plan, what to do at different ages.

    3. Civics, maybe you will want to run the show.

    4. Law-related education, you do the crime, you do the time.

    Do you believe that the K-12 system in Oregon should get involved in early childhood care to help provide more child care options and education, and if so, how?

    Child care, I think it is time to get businesses public & private to have on-site child care facilities. These would be good for the kids, parents & businesses. It would reduce a lot of stress for everyone involved.

    What do you see as the two biggest barriers to creating an adequate supply of child care in Oregon, and what do you propose to change to help alleviate the shortage of child care?

    Tax incentives for the above would get things started.

    Much of the economy of rural Oregon is based on agriculture, natural resource extraction and tourism. Agriculture is consolidating, natural resource extraction is in decline, and tourism provides mostly minimum-wage jobs. As governor, what are the first three steps you would take to build a stronger economy in rural Oregon?

    Yes, we need to fix & build our roads, bridges & ports. As they are needed for business & pleasure.

    State government has a lot of tools to help the economy. Please rank the following to show your support, with 1 being the highest priory. Use 0 for any idea you do not support.
    __ Targeted tax breaks for key industries
    __ Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.
    __ Direct financial aid to specific businesses
    __ Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?
    __ Other (be specific)


    N/A

    What specific steps would you take to increase access to housing and housing stock for low and middle-income Oregonians?

    House building is done at the city & county level. They need to speed up the permit process & lower their permit fees to increase the building of more houses.

    How would you support local efforts to provide designated places for unhoused Oregonians including overnight parking sites, tent camping sites and tiny homes? Would that support include seeking state funding?

    I will support more tent/small house sites to be built.

    The legislature has been working to make it easier to build more units of housing in cities, to close the gap between housing supply and demand. Has it gone far enough? Will you make it easier for cities to adopt practices allowing more rapid and more dense construction?

    I will push the cities & counties to zone for more homes in the price range for lower & middle home buyers
     
  6. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    Michael Trimble
    Portland
    Customer Service, CareOregon

    The Oregon governor’s office is usually reactive when it comes to dealing with drought. What specific steps would you take to provide long-term solutions for years of increasing drought?

    I will create a commission comprised of tech companies, leading conservation think tanks, and those on the front lines dealing with this very severe issue to come up with a long-term sustainable water solutions and practices. My administrative will be a proactive one, looking and planning for the next catastrophe/emergency, not just reacting.

    In the absence of action by the legislature, Gov. Brown created a climate protection plan by executive order to reduce carbon emissions. That plan is being challenged in court. If elected, would you renew that order or rescind it? Why?

    I will renew it and have the legislature enact the recommendations proposed by my drought commission as well as codify the executive order.

    In addition to climate change, scientists throughout the state have raised concerns that Oregon’s reliance on “clearing fuel” as a form of forest management contributes to worsening conditions. Conversely, timber industry groups continue to champion industrially planted forests and timber harvests as an important tool in suppressing wildfires. What stakeholders would you include in conversation as you develop your forest management policy?

    I will include everyone and all points of view, as at this point we cannot afford to. The timber industry has been dismissed for far too long. They do have some creative if not out-of-the-box ideas worth exploring. I will be an open mingled governor.

    Measure 110 decriminalized drugs in Oregon while stepping up treatment. How would you confront the state’s failure to meet the intent of the law to ensure thousands of Oregonians get treatment?

    I will mandate treatment to any and all who receive housing assistance/subsidies. I refuse to enable/fund drug addiction by not attaching treatment as a condition. Many people use drugs as a result of abuse, neglect, mental health, etc. I, myself, voted for measure 110 because I do not believe in criminalizing peoples’ reactions to their pasts/ongoing troubles, but I do believe in getting people off of drugs and back into society as productive citizens.

    What state action would you direct to confront the threat to health and safety posed by fentanyl?

    I will expand distribution and use of naloxone and overdose prevention education along with awareness about and access to and availability of treatment for substance use disorders. Early intervention with individuals at highest risk for overdose is beyond critical. Increasing the penalties for dealing fentanyl or mixing it with other drugs will be an integral part of my comprehensive war on fentanyl. Wide at no-cost availability of test strips are crucial to detecting drugs laced with fentanyl. While some argue safe needle exchange/safe zones to use drugs are akin to endorsing/enabling, I believe these safety nets are necessary medical evils to be able to monitor and intervene in the chance of an overdose.

    What steps would you take to address the stress of educators, students and parents and keep our public K-12 schools from imploding?

    We have got to reduce the size of our classes, and I will see this is done by the end of my first year in office. We must hire many more teachers and teaching support staff to be able to give our children the education they deserve. While remote learning/teaching is not very popular, I will leave it as an option for those that remote learning/teaching does work well for.

    Do you believe that the K-12 system in Oregon should get involved in early childhood care to help provide more child care options and education, and if so, how?

    I absolutely do believe childcare and preschool for children below 5 should and must be provided at no cost to the parent(s). Too many single parents are not able to work because of child care. (All) working parents mean more taxable income for the state to spend on childcare and education programs investing in our children. As governor, I will implement many of the childcare programs in the “Build Back Better" bill.

    What do you see as the two biggest barriers to creating an adequate supply of child care in Oregon, and what do you propose to change to help alleviate the shortage of child care?

    Childcare providers and the costs associated with paying them as well as the childcare itself are the two biggest barriers I see to creating an adequate supply of childcare in Oregon. There are many people who love working with children and would love to be a child care provider, but the salaries for these essential workers lag very far behind. As governor, I will be sure to pay childcare providers living wages, not just minimum wages along with good benefits. Covering the costs of providing the actual child care, childcare provider celery is not included is actually a financial number the state can more than pitch in.

    Much of the economy of rural Oregon is based on agriculture, natural resource extraction and tourism. Agriculture is consolidating, natural resource extraction is in decline, and tourism provides mostly minimum-wage jobs. As governor, what are the first three steps you would take to build a stronger economy in rural Oregon?

    I will increase Oregon’s investment in the Rural Opportunity Initiative by at least 5 million dollars and much more each subsequent year I’m in office

    One divide separating rural businesses from urban businesses is infrastructure, particularly access to broadband internet. Modern farms need good digital infrastructure to run well. They use the internet as much as any other business. They have websites and other forms of online marketing. For those who don’t farm but live and work in a rural area, this is also important. Broadband access allows people to telecommute or run a home business. I will be the first governor to make sure that every area of Oregon has access to broadband Internet, not dial-up or satellite, but broadband with DSL speeds if not faster.

    Farming has always been a complex, skilled profession. But today, it requires even more technical skills than before. A modern farmer is as likely to use a drone as well as drive a tractor. Access to great agricultural education means young farmers will get a better start in their careers and find new revenue streams for their family farms. As governor, I will make all in-state education free making access to capital for investing much easier.

    State government has a lot of tools to help the economy. Please rank the following to show your support, with 1 being the highest priory. Use 0 for any idea you do not support.
    __ Targeted tax breaks for key industries
    __ Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.
    __ Direct financial aid to specific businesses
    __ Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?
    __ Other (be specific)


    5) Targeted tax breaks for key industries

    1) Direct financial aid to education/job training programs.

    3) Direct financial aid to specific businesses

    1) Infrastructure and public works, such as broadband and transportation?

    What specific steps would you take to increase access to housing and housing stock for low and middle-income Oregonians?

    There are entirely way too many vacant properties and buildings just sitting going to waste. As governor, I will seize those properties and buildings under eminent domain and give them to nonprofit organizations/agencies to retrofit them into housing. I will work with state/public/NGO agencies to build at least 25,000 low-income houses/apartments each year and rent these to low-income and unemployed Oregonians. I will transition us to a renter-to-owner program rather than the existing rent-only/mortgage program.

    I will lower rents of middle-to-low-income by at least $100 at multi-unit apartment properties in my first 100 days while I work with the legislature to ultimately cap rents of middle-to-low-income to 30% of their income in my first term. I will ban all rent-related non-refundable fees including application and pet fees, as well as criminalize vacancies longer than 45 days. If a vacancy can't be filled after 45 days, the government will give that unit to a tenant on the waiting list. There is no reason for vacancies with so many people looking for housing. Where I live, there have been vacant units sitting unoccupied for months because the property management company refuses to rent at below market value. All that will end as your governor.

    I will mandate Section 8 be accepted by all landlords/property managers and work to cut the obscenely egregious waiting lists/times to under 100 days. I will seize all vacant buildings/properties under eminent domain and give them to nonprofits/organizations/agencies ready to convert them into housing. I will overhaul zoning to discourage single unit-only dwellings to expand multi-unit/shared dwellings.

    How would you support local efforts to provide designated places for unhoused Oregonians including overnight parking sites, tent camping sites and tiny homes? Would that support include seeking state funding?

    I, 111% support temporary, outdoor shelters via house pods like those in Portland which are replacing tents altogether. These mini units are equipped with heat, electricity, a locked door. These “pod communities” offer transitional support, meals, drinking water and bathroom facilities. This transitory solution takes so many people off of the streets living in precarious tent situations. As governor, I will expand these communities into every county along with significantly increased funding. I will use eminent domain to seize unused vast vacant lots/grounds to facilitate/house as many units as possible!
    Ultimately though, we absolutely must move in a housing, not shelter mentality/direction.

    The legislature has been working to make it easier to build more units of housing in cities, to close the gap between housing supply and demand. Has it gone far enough? Will you make it easier for cities to adopt practices allowing more rapid and more dense construction?

    I commend the legislature for their efforts, but sadly these efforts have not gone far enough. Yes, I will absolutely make it easier for cities to adopt practices not just allowing but encouraging/incentivizing more rapid and more dense construction along with overhauling decades of backwards zoning policies that favored single occupant home over multiple occupant home.

    My housing as a human rights policy will drastically impact Oregon’s signature land-use development system as we will be pushing land use for housing primarily.
     
  7. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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  8. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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  9. julius

    julius Global Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator

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    SO tired of hearing candidates say "leftist" this or "radical" that.

    Fuck off. Quit using words to scare ignorant people into voting for you because you have no plan, you lazy ass scare mongers.
     
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  10. Stevenson

    Stevenson Old School

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    I'm a proud lefty who has only voted for a Republican once in 40 years.

    I would vote GOP for governor right now though because this state, and city in particular, are in trouble. But, having read the Republican nominees positions above, I can't. The present version of the GOP is loony tunes. Right wing Trumpian gibberish imo.

    I'm thinking Betsy Johnson.
     
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  11. ehizzy3

    ehizzy3 RIP mgb

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  12. julius

    julius Global Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator

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    Yep, they are loons.

    One thing I've noticed about GOP candidates is, they are about scaring their base, dividing us, and making things better for only them. It's not about making things better as a whole, it's about scaring people into making things like it used to be, and benefitting only one group.

    What are progressives/liberals for? Cleaner earth, safe schools, access to education, clean drinking water, housing, jobs, equality, peace, respect, dignity, understanding...

    what are conservatives for? Power over people, controlling people, against education (teachers/schools indoctrinate our kids!!1!!) greed, being able to disrespect people (them gays want to groom your kids! and use your bathrooms!) getting their own at the expense of others (get your taxes off rich peoples money...even tho I'm dirt poor!), we conservatives are the REAL victims! Racism only exists against white people!

    Conservatives didn't used to be that way. But they have made their umbrella tiny, and unwelcoming.
     
  13. UncleCliffy'sDaddy

    UncleCliffy'sDaddy Circling the bowl.....

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    I have always tried my best to vote for the candidates I felt would be best suited for the position, regardless of party affiliation. In 2018 I voted for Knute Buehler for governor, and for Kim Thatcher for Secretary of State, because I felt they were better qualified than Brown and Fagan. I also felt their elections to those positions would provide a better balance of views and values across the state (Not necessarily "better" views and values, but at least more balanced than currently). But....................as soon as each of those individuals lost their races, they immediately (and very publicly) proclaimed themselves as "Trump Republicans", because (as both admitted) there was no other way forward for a Republican to win in Oregon. Those cynical and disgusting actions, along with the cynical and disgusting actions taken by Republicans throughout the country have made it virtually certain I will never vote for another Republican in my lifetime for ANY position whatsoever. They are clearly and unapologetically anti Democracy and anti Constitution (while driving a white agenda). They are a clear and present danger to America. And it's going to get a whole lot worse before it gets any better......
     
  14. HailBlazers

    HailBlazers RIPcity

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    Cap and trade is looney considering our big neighbor to the east polluting the world beyond belief
     
  15. Voodoo

    Voodoo An American hero

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    Yup pretty much my stance too, where are the reasonable human beings here? Betsy seems to be the best bet.
     
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  16. Voodoo

    Voodoo An American hero

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    It makes sense if we want to incentivize being invested in our own energy independence, it would be better not only for the planet but for the country if we didn’t rely on fossil fuels for our energy usage. The faster we get off them better imo regardless of what China does.
     
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  17. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    California has been flirting with 100% of the energy coming from renewables for the last month and finally hit it a few days ago. It won't be able to continue that during the summer months but they're moving in the right direction.
     
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  18. HailBlazers

    HailBlazers RIPcity

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    Christine Drazen is pretty damn reasonable. Not that this state could ever elect a republican again. Praying for Betsy at this point, Tina would be a disaster.
     
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  19. Phatguysrule

    Phatguysrule Well-Known Member

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    Pointing out a rapist who has 50 victims doesn't make it ok for you to rape 1 or 2.

    But that's what you sound like when you make that argument.
     
  20. SlyPokerDog

    SlyPokerDog Woof! Staff Member Administrator

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    Phatguysrule and Hoopguru like this.

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